Sheridan Chapter

Sheridan, Wyoming

Advancing the Legacy Since 1910

The Sheridan Chapter was organized in 1910 with 25 members, and throughout the years has maintained its interest in both national history and state of Wyoming and Sheridan County history.

In 1914, as part of a statewide DAR collaboration, the chapter worked tirelessly to mark old forts, historical trails, and battlefields. The Sheridan Chapter set markers at the site of the Wagon Box fight, and also contributed to the monument that marked the site of the first log cabin in the city of Sheridan.

The chapter began its commitment to education during 1914 when it first awarded $10.00 to an eighth grader for the best average in U.S. History. Today with the DAR Good Citizens Scholarship Contest and the American History Essay Contest, chapter members continue to encourage the youth in Sheridan, Buffalo, and the surrounding areas.

Chapter members also support our U.S. active duty military and local veterans, and take pride in their volunteer hours at the Sheridan VA Medical Center.  Recently, as a  Partner in the 50th Anniversary of Vietnam Commemoration, chapter members honored 21 Vietnam Veterans and their spouses at the 50th Reunion of Sheridan High School, presenting them with Vietnam War Veteran lapel pins.  

With a current membership of 62, the Sheridan Chapter membership proudly includes the Wyoming State librarian and two Daughters who serve as state committee chairs.

About Sheridan

John D. Loucks, founding father and first mayor of Sheridan, arrived in the area in 1881. He purchased the Mandel Cabin, which served as a post office, and drew out the plot map of the town on wrapping paper. By 1882, the town he had named for his commanding officer in the Civil War, General Philip Sheridan, was registered with the state. It gained the attention of the railroad in 1888 and the railroad arrived in 1892. The subsequent construction of the Sheridan coal camps brought about an increase in population that continued into the 1920s. Sheridan and the area grew not just agriculturally, but also with the coal mines.

The growth continued with Buffalo Bill Cody’s assistance in building the Sheridan Inn to accommodate travelers, including himself, and his Wild West Show.

The area saw great prosperity when cattle baron John B. Kendrick moved to Sheridan. Completion of the Flemish Revival Mansion he named Trail End, came in 1913, eight years after he donated the 70 acres known as Pioneer Park. It was first a zoo housing both common and exotic animals and in 1936 the name was changed to Kendrick Park in honor of Senator John B. Kendrick. The park is still enjoyed by Sheridan residents today.

During the 1920s other businesses found Sheridan an ideal location, including the Sheridan Flouring Mill, Holly Sugar Mill, and Sheridan Brewery.

A source of higher education came to the area when Sheridan College was established in 1948.

Sheridan has continued to adapt while maintaining its past. Visit us during the Sheridan WYO Rodeo!